For the first time, the accident at the Fukushima nuclear power plant was associated with two cases of throat cancer

For the first time, the accident at the Fukushima nuclear power plant was associated with two cases of throat cancer
For the first time, the accident at the Fukushima nuclear power plant was associated with two cases of throat cancer
Anonim

At least two cases of throat cancer are directly related to the nuclear disaster at the Fukushima nuclear power plant, which struck the coast of Japan 10 years ago.

Two men who were dealing with the aftermath of the Fukushima nuclear power plant disaster fell ill with throat cancer seven years after the disaster

According to the Japanese news outlet NHK, Japan's Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare has acknowledged that the Fukushima nuclear disaster played a direct role in the development of laryngeal cancer in two men. One of the men, who was in his 40s, died of an illness.

The two unnamed men were involved in the aftermath of the March 2011 Fukushima nuclear disaster. They were diagnosed with cancer in 2018. The experts concluded that both men did not have major lifestyle risks, such as smoking or excessive alcohol consumption, that would contribute to the development of the disease. The period between exposure and disease onset was also more than five years. A shorter period could indicate that the cancer began to develop before the accident.

The experts also concluded that men were exposed to significantly more than safe levels of millisieverts (mSv), a unit of measurement for ionizing radiation. They had over 100 millisieverts in their bodies. By comparison, the average person is exposed to about 2.4 millisieverts per year.

This is the first time that laryngeal cancer has been recognized as an occupational accident since the Fukushima accident. However, other cancers have been linked to nuclear disaster. At least six other Fukushima workers have developed leukemia, thyroid cancer, or lung cancer, according to NHK.

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