Scientists believe there will be "almost certain" a variant of the coronavirus that will defeat the existing vaccines

Scientists believe there will be "almost certain" a variant of the coronavirus that will defeat the existing vaccines
Scientists believe there will be "almost certain" a variant of the coronavirus that will defeat the existing vaccines
Anonim

In an analysis by British scientists, published by the UK government's official scientific advisory group, they say they think it is "almost certain" that there will be a SARS-Cov-2 variant that "will beat the current vaccines." SARS-CoV-2 is the virus that causes Covid-19.

The document is dated July 26 and was published by the British government on Friday.

The scientists write that since it is "unlikely" to eradicate the virus, they have a "high confidence" that options will continue to emerge. They say it is "almost certain" that there will be "a gradual or intermittent build-up of antigenic variation that will ultimately render the vaccine useless."

They recommend that authorities continue to reduce transmission of the virus as much as possible to reduce the likelihood of a new, vaccine-resistant variant emerging.

They also recommend focusing research on new vaccines that not only prevent hospitalization and illness, but also "induce high and sustained levels of mucosal immunity."

The goal, they said, should be "to reduce infection and transmission from vaccinated individuals" and "to reduce the possibility of breeding variants in vaccinated individuals." Several companies making Covid-19 vaccines are already researching new options.

This opinion was expressed in a paper by a group of scientists on long-term evolution scenarios for SARS-CoV-2, which was discussed and published by the UK Science Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE).

They write that some of the variants that have emerged over the past few months "show a reduced susceptibility to immunity acquired with vaccines, although none of them seem to have completely escaped it."

But they warn that these options appeared "before widespread vaccination," and that "as vaccines spread, the advantage in transmission of a virus that can bypass vaccine-acquired immunity will increase."

SAGE has warned of this issue before.

In the July 7 SAGE meeting minutes, the scientists wrote that "the combination of high prevalence and high vaccination rates creates the conditions under which a variant is most likely to emerge that can elude immunity." At the same time it was said that "the likelihood of this is unknown, but this option would pose a significant risk both in the UK and internationally."

Popular by topic