Scientists have recorded a mysterious signal from space

Scientists have recorded a mysterious signal from space
Scientists have recorded a mysterious signal from space
Anonim

While scientists do not know what caused the repeated flares, they found similarities with the activity of magnetars - a type of neutron stars with an extremely strong magnetic field.

Astronomers at Swinburne University of Technology in Australia have identified mysterious and almost imperceptible re-bursts of FRB 171019.

According to Science Alert, scientists were looking for signs of repeats in 20 FRBs (fast radio bursts) using the ASKAP Australian Square Kilometer Array Pathfinder radio telescope complex, spending about 12 thousand hours on this. Since the search was unsuccessful, the researchers began to observe FRB 171019 using the Green Bank radio telescope in the United States and the Parks Observatory radio telescope in Australia.

The information received by Green Bank showed two weak signals. This indicates that repetitive radio bursts are more common than previously thought, and many of the single bursts are in fact related to them, but their signals are simply outside the detection range of these instruments. Latent signals from FRB 171019 are 590 times weaker than the burst recorded by ASKAP.

While scientists do not know what caused the repeated flares, they found similarities with the activity of magnetars - a type of neutron stars with an extremely strong magnetic field. Although FRBs are a hundred billion times brighter than these objects, the researchers believe the findings will help refine models that explain the phenomenon of fast radio bursts.

The duration of a fast radio pulse lasts a few milliseconds and is accompanied by the release of a large amount of energy - such as the sun has emitted over several tens of thousands of years. One of the hypotheses says that this phenomenon is associated with the activities of alien civilizations.

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