Sandstorm from the ISS

Sandstorm from the ISS
Sandstorm from the ISS
Anonim

Russian cosmonaut Sergei Kud-Sverchkov allowed a glimpse of the sirocco wind from near-earth orbit.

Europeans were able to see the sand brought from the desert by the sirocco wind with their own eyes, and for the inhabitants of the whole world a sandstorm from space was shown by Sergey Kud-Sverchkov.

Sirocco is a strong hot wind in the countries of the Mediterranean basin, originating in the deserts of North Africa, in the Middle East. This wind forms in warm, dry, tropical air masses that move northward in a low pressure direction eastward across the Mediterranean.

In early February, the sirocco covered Europe - in a number of cities, the sky turned orange, and in some ski resorts, white snow was also covered with a layer of wind-blown sand. Sirocco can last from several hours to several days. This wind, due to its dryness, negatively affects humans and living organisms in general, and the dust and sand they bring from the deserts can spoil things.

I think many have already seen footage from France online, where, due to a sandstorm, the sky turned beige. And this is how it looks from space, from the International Space Station.

Such an unusual natural phenomenon was caused by a powerful wind, which brought a lot of sand from the Sahara desert. pic.twitter.com/HA1laJTtHP

- Sergey Kud-Sverchkov (@KudSverchkov) February 8, 2021

Roscosmos test cosmonaut Sergei Kud-Sverchkov, who is now at the International Space Station (ISS) as a flight engineer for the ISS crew under the ISS-63/64 program for long-term space expeditions, removed the sirocco from near-earth orbit.

“I think many people have already seen footage from France on the Internet, where, due to a sandstorm, the sky turned beige. And this is how it looks from space, from the International Space Station. Such an unusual natural phenomenon was caused by a powerful wind that brought a lot of sand from the Sahara Desert,”wrote Sergey Kud-Sverchkov on his Twitter page in the caption to the pictures.

Recall that before this, the Russian cosmonaut published a video on social networks with a flight over the Earth from the ISS, and also showed the hottest place on Earth - the sandy-saline desert Deshte-Lut in Iran.

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